An Early Hypnotic Subject Speaks

Dr. James John Garth Wilkinson was an early Victorian hypnotist. He was hypnotised by James Braid, the founder of hypnotherapy, observed many of his experiments, and became a hypnotist himself. Wilkinson was also a popular writer and describes the subjective experience of being hypnotised in colourful and expressive language, e.g., as a “diamond glare” of focused attention, etc.

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That Hypnotism Never Meant Mind-Control According to its Founder James Braid

Another short snippet from James Braid, the founder of hypnotherapy, which makes it very clear that Braid emphasised hypnotism required the conscious consent of the subject and could not be used for “mind-control”, contrary to the claims of the Mesmerists.

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What Bernheim Really Said about Hypnosis

This short article provides some little-known quotations from Hippolyte Bernheim’s later writings in which the father of 20th century hypnotism makes it clear that he does not consider hypnosis to be in any way related to sleep but rather to be a general state of heightened suggestibility.

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Did Hypnotism Originate as a Form of Meditation?

This short article explains how hypnotism actually originated, in part, under the influence of Oriental meditation techniques, described in the writings of James Braid, the founder of hypnotherapy.

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Online Preview of The Discovery of Hypnosis, The Complete Writings of James Braid, The Father of Hypnotherapy (2009)

The Discovery of Hypnosis: The Complete Writings of James Braid, the Father of Hypnotherapy (2009) can now be browsed and searched free online with Google Books. Copies are available for purchase from Anglo-American Books, Amazon, and The National Council for Hypnotherapy (NCH).

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